Insomnia (insomnia) wrote,

The filthy Sanchez.

The ACLU today released a memo signed by Lieutenant General Ricardo A. Sanchez authorizing 29 interrogation techniques, including 12 which far exceeded limits established by the Army’s own Field Manual. More specifically, it points out that Gen. Sanchez committed perjury when testifying before Congress.

From Sanchez' testimony of May 19, 2004:

U.S. SENATOR JACK REED (D-RI): General Sanchez, today's USA Today, sir, reported that you ordered or approved the use of sleep deprivation, intimidation by guard dogs, excessive noise and inducing fear as an interrogation method for a prisoner in Abu Ghraib prison. Is that correct?

SANCHEZ: Sir, that may be correct that it's in a news article, but I never approved any of those measures to be used within CJTF-7 at any time in the last year.

That is absolutely refuted by the newly released memo, which says:

Presence of Military Working Dog: Exploits Arab fear of dogs ...
Sleep Management: Detainee provided minimum of 4 hours sleep per 24 hour period, not to exceed 72 continuous hours.
Yelling, Loud Music, and Light Control: Used to create fear... (Sanchez's wording, not mine.)

Sanchez is clearly guilty of perjury, and should face the wrath of Congress... and the Senate should determine the guilt of his boss, Donald Rumsfeld, while they're at it.

*UPDATE* This post is starting to get some attention on other sites, such as MetaFilter, Tom Tomorrow, Atrios, and DailyKos. This morning, I called the office of Senator Reed, at (202) 224-4642, to make them aware of this act of perjury, as well as calling my local senator. I encourage everyone who reads this to take a minute and do the same. We must get our politicians talking about the seriousness of Gen. Sanchez' actions. No senator likes being lied to. It makes them pissed off... and rightly so. Let's hope they'll do something about it.

Also, as a matter of clarification, the evidence hasn't been fully uncovered yet regarding Rumsfeld's possible involvement in this matter. That said, it is known that Rumsfeld had previously approved the interrogation methods for Guantanamo, which the methods in Sanchez' memo were based upon. Also, in August 2003, it was Rumsfeld who arranged for Major-General Geoffrey Miller to be sent to Iraq from Gunatanamo to, “review current Iraqi Theatre ability to rapidly exploit internees for actionable intelligence”. Miller then proceeded to take control over the interrogations at Abu Ghraib away from Army General Janis Karpinski.

In other words, we know that at about the same time that Sanchez' new Gitmo'ized policies went into place, that Rumsfeld had sent in a 'Gitmo "fixer" to get info out of those prisoners.

Coincidence?!

tangaroa

March 31 2005, 20:19:19 UTC 9 years ago

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Re: How many memos does the ACLU have to expose?

The ACLU can expose as many memos as it's capable of, but as long as the information doesn't make it out to the masses, the people aren't going to know enough to care about it. How many heard about the memo suggesting that Bush personally authorized a certain level of torture? Probably not many more will hear about this one. I don't think most Americans are even aware that torture has gone on outside Abu Ghrab, and many people -- including many of the Congressmen speaking for Gonzales's appointment -- seem unaware of the level of torture that took place there. The ACLU just doesn't have the political power to "make news" the way the Republican Party can. It doesn't help that there's been a decades-long smear campaign against the organization.

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